30 Jun 2011, 00:30
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Scott Bronson (1 post)

Autotest is so heavyweight and painful to configure. It’s got tons of broken extensions. I’m not a fan.

For me, Guard works great. I’d hate to go back. http://asciicasts.com/episodes/264-guard

04 Aug 2011, 03:41
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Travis Tilley (2 posts)

I’d like to second that statement, but as a contributor to rb-fsevent I’m probably more than a little opinionated.

08 Aug 2011, 22:37
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Travis Tilley (2 posts)

Actually, I’m having a very hard time taking a book on “continuous testing” seriously that doesn’t have an entire chapter dedicated to guard, and this book only mentions it in a footnote.

guard: 52,988 downloads according to rubygems.org watchr: 43,067 downloads according to rubygems.org

Much closer than expected, however:

github search for “gem ‘guard’” results in 4444 Gemfiles. github search for “gem ‘watchr’” results in 869 Gemfiles.

and, just as important… plugins for guard listed on rubygems.org: 49

In the same Guardfile I can have a setup that automatically runs my tests, rebuilds my documentation, bitches at me about any code that I have NOT documented properly, re-runs bundler if my Gemfile changes, regenerates css when using sass/compass, regenerates javascript when using coffeescript, reloads an open browser to automatically reflect those changes as they are made… and best of all, these plugins aren’t all that complex to write should you need to extend guard with functionality of your own.

13 Mar 2013, 16:46
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Ben Rady (9 posts)

Yes, if I had the book to write over again, I would definitely use Guard to demonstrate the technique, rather than AutoTest. It’s a much more powerful and flexible tool.

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