03 Oct 2012, 15:44
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Brad Gibbs (7 posts)

I enjoyed and learned a lot from the 1st edition. I just downloaded the beta of the 2nd version and it looks like a major update – well worth the $21, even in this early beta form. Looking forward to reading it from cover to cover.

I did skim through for a couple of bits I’m particularly keen to learn more about – NSOutlineView and NSIncrementalStore. I’d really like to see more coverage of using Core Data with NSOutlineView. You mention it and caution against using NSTreeController, but, we could we get a little more discussion and some code?

Also, please consider adding a chapter on NSIncrementalStore (or AFIncrementalStore). Particularly for iOS, the ability to hook into a networked database so cleanly is very appealing, but there’s very little information out there on the topic. It seems like a much better approach than Sync Services or Distributed Core Data, or even iCloud, for that matter.

Thanks.

Brad

03 Oct 2012, 18:14
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Gordon Apple (28 posts)

I can’t tell from the contents if this is in there but I would appreciate two topics being covered. One is how to best handle migration when using NSPersistentDocument. The other is recommendations on how to handle arrayController bindings with NSOrderedSets.

03 Oct 2012, 23:51
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koen (2 posts)

I also like to see a good description of the use of CoreData with an NSOutlineView and NSTreeController to create an iTunes style Source List, including custom folders and smart folders.

08 Oct 2012, 00:38
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Marcus S. Zarra (254 posts)

Thank you for your suggestions. I will look into expanding the Mac specific portion of the book to include some deeper coverage of NSOutlineView and NSTreeController.

I am and have been on the fence about including NSIncrementalStore. Many people are looking towards it as a silver bullet.

17 Oct 2012, 14:31
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Andrew W. Donoho (4 posts)

Marcus,

My biggest disappointment about your earlier edition was that you basically failed to address predicates in any substantive form. (I believe you covered this critical piece of Core Data in about 3/4 of a single page and directed readers to Apple’s documentation.) Because of this serious omission seen in a colleague’s copy of your book, I declined to purchase the earlier edition.

Predicates are the query language of Core Data. How to use them well is part of why I would buy your new edition. Understanding how predicates interact with your schema design is critical to writing performant Core Data code. For example, using the regex tools to perform textual refinement might be very instructive. Also, taking common SQL style joins etc and showing how they map onto Core Data and predicates would be quite useful. Finally, the Core Data team claims, sometimes correctly, that Core Data can out perform straight SQLite. How can I make this happen in my apps?

In other words, I’m looking for a book that helps me use Core Data well. Punting on the discussion of predicates, as you did last time, makes your book much less valuable.

Andrew

06 Nov 2012, 19:42
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Marcus S. Zarra (254 posts)

Andrew,

Predicates should have a book of their own. The existed before Core Data and are extremely complex/powerful. We do not delve deeply into them as a deep dive into them is/would be a distraction from the focus of the book.

There are some plans in the works to cover the gap around predicates but that coverage will not be in this book.

21 Nov 2012, 18:20
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Andrew W. Donoho (4 posts)

Marcus,

I understand. That said, Apple’s documentation and your competing author’s books are woefully inadequate to the task of documenting how to use the predicate system well.

In other words, I will preorder a copy of a your unannounced NSPredicate book. As I am an accomplished Core Data programmer, I’m even willing to help review chapters as you write them. (I also teach beginning iOS programming at the local community college.)

This book needs to be written and you are likely to be a good author to do it.

Andrew

24 Nov 2012, 01:38
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Gordon Apple (28 posts)

I have the eBook now and have read a lot and skimmed the rest. I would still like to see more treatment of NSOrderSets, how to bind to them, etc. Also, how about mentioning the $%^& non-functional autogenerated accessors for ordered sets. I’m really tired of having to re-modify my own accessors for every entity that needs them. I made one attempt to write a pair of macros (.h and .m) to do this, but found my macro-writing skills somewhat lacking.

26 Nov 2012, 10:04
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Marcus S. Zarra (254 posts)

In my personal opinion, ordered sets should never have been added to Core Data. They are an unnecessary crutch that people are going to abuse. They are solution to an edge case but people will use them when they are not needed.

That is the primary reason for not discussing them in detail; I do not want to be supporting their use.

01 Dec 2012, 02:55
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Gordon Apple (28 posts)

I’m going to take major issue with you on this point. IMHO, it is a VERY welcomed feature. I would never have even considered using CoreData until it had this feature. Most of my data model implicitly involves order. It would be totally useless without it, and I certainly do not consider it to be an “edge” case. Without it, you have a nightmare of managing indexes to keep them properly ordered. This cannot be done by using predicates to produce ordered arrays. Order, itself, is a prime property of the collection.

I think you should adjust your attitude and consider the fact that some of us have real needs which may not fit your limited universe.

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