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Biopic_100x100_pragsmall
13 Jan 2009, 02:15
Bill Dudney (917 posts)

Hi Everyone,

Welcome to the Obj-C 2.0 Screencast!

Looking forward to hearing from you!

Dave_pragsmall
14 Jan 2009, 15:34
David St-Onge (1 post)

Hi Bill !

This screencast series is very welcome since I bought your 2 first iPhone screencasts and then gave up because of my lack of objective C knowledge. I did not know where to start. I’ll get those screencast this week end !

Thanks Bill !

David

Biopic_100x100_pragsmall
14 Jan 2009, 23:24
Bill Dudney (917 posts)

Hey David,

Great! I’m really glad you are back in the game.

Looking forward to the cool stuff you build!

35-m-550_pragsmall
15 Jan 2009, 10:56
Joseph Crawford (19 posts)

Bill this is great I loved your last screencast on core animation. One question though. In part one you create init method for the movie player that uses the word and in the parameter list. I am told this is a bad naming convention.

for instance

  • (id)initWithName:(NSString *)locName andPhone:(NSString *)locPhone andLat:(float)locLat andLon:(float)locLon;

is it true that you should not include the word and but rather find better names

Biopic_100x100_pragsmall
15 Jan 2009, 12:13
Bill Dudney (917 posts)

Hi Joseph,

Thanks for the kind words!

When ever I wondering about a naming convention I try to look for patterns in the Apple supplied classes.

initForURL:withContentsOfURL:ofType:error:

is a method on NSDocument (part of Cocoa instead of Cocoa Touch but same concept applies).

It is fairly common to use the idea you are trying to convey with the init method in the method name. If that includes the name of the variable then fine, if not that is just as fine. The important thing is to convey the idea.

If you still have the reference to where you saw the recommendation I’d love to take a look, might give me some more context to answer from.

Good luck!

Generic-user-small
15 Jan 2009, 15:47
Rob (2 posts)

Hi Bill,

Great screen cast. I am new to Objective-C coming from a procedural “big iron” background on the IBM AS/400 (iSeries). You series on iPhone and Objective-C (so far) have been wonderful in helping me upgrade my skills. Being dyslexic the visual nature of these are perfect for me.

Anyway, I would love to see a more in depth screen cast dealing with the debugger and all it has to offer from the perspective of a someone new to the platform and language.

Thanks again!

Rob

Dbt_pragsmall
17 Jan 2009, 20:13
gansodesoya (5 posts)

Bill, I loved the first and the second episodes, I’m hungry here! when are you planning to release the third one?

Cheers!

Gus.

Generic-user-small
19 Jan 2009, 19:10
Thomas Dohmke (1 post)

Hi Bill,

The rule not to use “and” to link the attributes of the receiver actually comes from Apple, see “Coding Guidelines for Cocoa”:http://developer.apple.com/documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/CodingGuidelines/Articles/NamingMethods.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/20001282-BCIGIJJF

Anyway, great screencast and I hope to see more episodes.

Cheers.

Thomas

Generic-user-small
20 Jan 2009, 02:13
Jon Peters (7 posts)

I too, have the same issue(s) as responder David St-Onge. I bought the iPhone screeencasts and because i could not follow them, i subsequently bought the Obj-C screencasts. Unfortunately (for me), neither of which satisfied my learning requirements, even though the audience for Obj-C is stated, in the product description on your website, is for those with no prior experience with Obj-C. In both sets of screencasts I found my self asking: “Why..did you do/choose..template, return argument etc. ?” I have read both E. Sadun’s and A. Hillegass’s books (up to a point), trying to find a book, tutorial, screencast, something, that will leave me with the ability to synthesize on my own, iPhone/Obj-C app. So far i have not found anything to satisfy that requirement.
In future screencasts, perhaps you could explain more often why you chose to do what you are demonstrating; like, why sometimes a return is to self, or return to cell, or how did you know to put the CGRect there as a argument, etc. Actually, i suggest you need to have somebody at my level sit with you and continually ask: “Why?”, and /or produce screencasts for the absolute beginner. Just watching you ‘do your thing’ is not sufficient. In addition, i still find the Apple documentation for the Classes/ Class methods very confusing, sometimes the methods are used in your code without change, and sometimes you change the parameter names in the method customization. It is confusing (to me) why this is so.. A screencast explaining how to interpret the Apple documentation would be a great addition. Even though i have experience in procedural languages and a dim recollection of Java, I feel that an enormous amountl of the necessary information to allow us to synthesize a reasonable sized iPhone (or Obj-C) app is lacking in the screencasts here. Any suggested readings, etc. to help me understand iPhone/Obj-C programming would be greatly appreciated, thank you.

Biopic_100x100_pragsmall
20 Jan 2009, 02:35
Bill Dudney (917 posts)

Hi Jon,

It would probably help me to know what programming environment you are coming from. I could try to build some content aimed at people coming from the same area of expertise.

If you are totally new to programming then I have heard really good things about Kochan’s book on ObjC 2.0 (i’ve not read it though).

Good luck and please let me know where you are coming from so I can try to help more.

Generic-user-small
20 Jan 2009, 09:28
Ian (6 posts)

I’m reading Kochan’s ObjC 2.0 and I’m wondering if there was any proof reading done at all. It’s riddled with mistakes that anyone can see, so I’m asking myself how much “new” stuff I’m learning that really is good.

Biopic_100x100_pragsmall
20 Jan 2009, 11:27
Bill Dudney (917 posts)

Hi Ian,

Sorry to hear that, perhaps I will stop recommending it then.

Generic-user-small
20 Jan 2009, 18:06
Jon Peters (7 posts)

Thanks Bill, I come from the procedural school as an amateur programmer,(PL/1 for example) and a 3x try at learning Java from a classrooom setting about 7 yrs ago. I have never made a living at programming, so I’m really a “Noob’.
My current challenges are: interpreting the Apple API’s (which/how to use them in code), the OOP terminology, and the Obj-C/iPhone program structures (what goes where in the controller classes, how to determine what subclasses are needed to be created) as a few examples. I have studied “C” from reading about it and it is straightforward to me. I think your Obj-C and iPhone screencasts are way beyond my capabilities at this point. I will try to find the Kochan book (notwithstanding the comment/response above) for a ‘look-see’.

Generic-user-small
20 Jan 2009, 18:19
Jon Peters (7 posts)

P.S. I see Kochan has a 2nd edition out dated Dec 2008 (pp: 624) that includes the topics: Cocoa and the iPhone SDK, (Introduction to Cocoa and writing iPhone applications) Hopefully that is not the edition Ian is referring to that is riddled with mistakes.

Generic-user-small
21 Jan 2009, 21:00
Ian (6 posts)

Bill, Jon,

I really don’t want to flame the book and you should take a look before making up you decision to recommend the book or not but here are a few of the unbelievably simple mistakes and inconsistencies I saw:

P9. From the very first line of code in the book (and remember this is supposed to be for complete novices!):

#import Foundation/Foundation.h>”

yep the “<” is missing in the book too. So if someone types in the very first program to try it out, it will fail. Great start.

p50: Writing about data types: “You should never write programs that make assumptions about the size of your data types. However, you are guaranteed that a minimum amount of storage will be set aside for each basic data type. For example, it’s guaranteed that an integer value will be stored in a minimum of 32 bits of storage. However, once again, it’s not guaranteed.

p59: “Because division has higher precedence than addition, the value of a (25) is divided by 5 first. This gives the intermediate result of 4”. This is in the context of explaining a short, simple program line by line. Now this is obviously wrong and most people will realize this but it should have been caught in the proof reading. As they miss this sort of mistake which we can understand is a problem, how can we trust what is written in a more complex context where we are really seeing/learning something for the first time ?

p84: the author is taking about the increment operator and writes: “Some programmers prefer to put the plus plus or minus minus after the variable name, as in n plus plus or n minus minus. This is acceptable and is a matter of personal preference.” [1] Personal preference ??? The book fails to mention that the behavior of or is different. Maybe this is mentioned later in the book but there at least should have been a mention of preincrement/predecrement, etc. and to write that it’s personal preference is just plain wrong. [1] I replaced the action + and - signs withe the words “plus” and “minus” because otherwise the formatting was weird !

Jon, yes this is from the Second Edition (December 2008).

Ian

Generic-user-small
25 Jan 2009, 05:58
Chris Nickel (1 post)

Hi Bill,

Loved the screen casts, can’t wait for more.

A suggestion for new topics, and probably quite obvious would be Interface Builder. Thanks again,

Chris.

Generic-user-small
25 Jan 2009, 07:04
Els H (5 posts)

Hello Bill, Great Screencasts! I am not particulary a novice but not an expert either. I was wondering if there is going to be anything on Bindings and Key-Value Observation?

Cheers! Eli

Biopic_100x100_pragsmall
25 Jan 2009, 12:14
Bill Dudney (917 posts)

@Eli - In the plan, have to cover foundation first (esp dictionaries) but then I’ll do some KVO

@Chris - great idea! I’ll add that to the list.

35-m-550_pragsmall
29 Jan 2009, 16:16
Joseph Crawford (19 posts)

Bill,

If you look at screencast #1 you will see the reference I made to andThis andThat at about 53:40

Thanks for your feedback :)

Is there going to be more episodes for this screencast or is 2 all there will be?

Joseph Crawford

35-m-550_pragsmall
29 Jan 2009, 16:18
Joseph Crawford (19 posts)

I AGREE with the Debugger request, Debugging is something that is foreign to me at-least with XCode. Some of the exceptions I have gotten have been very hard to track down and seeing easier methods would be great.

35-m-550_pragsmall
29 Jan 2009, 16:29
Joseph Crawford (19 posts)

Bill you will also see a reference to using and in the parameter names at 1:00 in video #2

35-m-550_pragsmall
29 Jan 2009, 16:44
Joseph Crawford (19 posts)

Bill you will also see a reference to using and in the parameter names at 1:00 in video #2

35-m-550_pragsmall
29 Jan 2009, 16:44
Joseph Crawford (19 posts)

Bill,

Another suggestion for a screencast would be to show how to use Instruments/Leaks to find your memory leaks.

Generic-user-small
02 Feb 2009, 20:37
slothbear (7 posts)

@Objective-C beginners,

I found the Objective-C books at Apple at little dry, but they’re free, proofread, up-to-date, and available as HTML and PDF Maybe they’d fit your learning style. I still buy the Prags and other books because I need multiple views to learn.

http://developer.apple.com/documentation/Cocoa/ObjectiveCLanguage-date.html

[updated to change link to no-login-needed]

Generic-user-small
02 Feb 2009, 00:32
John Finch (2 posts)

Bill,

Thanks for the excellent screencast - far better than anything else I’ve seen! You have the right pace and depth and I love being able to stop the video, implement your steps (adding a few of my own to test out my knowledge) and then resume.

Suggestions for further screencasts would be:

Interface building Apple tools (debugger, profiler, diff etc)

Again, many thanks for making these screencasts so good and a putting them out at a reasonable price. Make more!

Kevincallahan_pragsmall
05 Feb 2009, 22:44
Kevin Callahan (2 posts)

Hi folks - I’ve purchased several of Pragmatic’s books and numerous screencasts (we want more!), including the recent, and EXCELLENT Memory Management videos. Seeing the repetition and time required to do many of the things Bill does in the videos inspired me to finish my update to Accessorizer. <p> Like others, I’ve been frustrated with the tedium of writing @property and @synthesize statements – sometimes using @dynamic and overriding using 1.0 style accessors.  Also, I like to handle certain TYPES with particular property attributes or specifiers.  <p> So, I pulled up my Accessorizer project from July 06 and added support for properties with auto-generating 1.0 accessors if you select @dynamic.  I’ve also implemented a defaults table so that Accessorizer will automagically select specifiers based on TYPE, and a custom table allowing you to further tweak the code on a per ivar basis. <p> It’s much faster using Accessorizer 1.2 than using auto-completion and far more flexible than using XCode’s built-in macros as is evidenced in this video: http://www.kevincallahan.org/AccessorizerVideoDemos/Accessorizer_HowToStayInXCode.mov <p> Accessorizer doesn’t just write accessors - but I don’t want to make this a plug (if it’s not too late!), I just wanted to let people know I’ve put out a tool to speed up the process of Cocoa and Cocoa Touch development and to help us minimize mistakes. <p>If you are interested, you can grab a copy here: http://www.kevincallahan.org/software/accessorizer.html
Hope you guys find Accessorizer a useful tool for iPhone development. I also hope this post is not inappropriate given the forum subject. Thanks! -Kevin

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