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Kevlook120_pragsmall
08 Mar 2009, 12:50
Kevin Yank (4 posts)

Although I have enjoyed this series overall, I must say I was a little miffed that garbage collection was so blatantly left out of Episode 2. The episode claims to cover memory management, explains that there are two approaches, and then only covers one of them. It says that the “garbage collection road may be easier”, but provides no guidance to starting down that road.

At a minimum, I feel Episode 2 should explain where one should go to find out about garbage collection. For this series to be complete, however, I feel that garbage collection should be covered as completely as was reference counting.

As it stands, it feels like Bill doesn’t understand garbage collection, and so chose to gloss over it rather than admit the hole in his knowledge. I apologize in advance if this is not the case, but that is the impression given.

Biopic_100x100_pragsmall
08 Mar 2009, 13:36
Bill Dudney (917 posts)

Hi Kevin,

The series is focused on iPhone development and thus no GC is available. We tried to write the summary of the episode to clearly state the focus. Here is a repeat of the synopsis.

bq. Objective-C 2.0 has a garbage collector, but it’s not available on the iPhone. So if you’re writing iPhone applications, you’ll need to manage your own memory. And it’s especially important on the iPhone, where resources are constrained, that you clean up after yourself. In this episode, we’ll find and fix various memory-management problems that are common in Objective-C programs. You’ll learn how to:

We will work on a more clear statement that this episode is focused on MemMgt on the iPhone.

Thanks for letting us know that it was confusing.

Kevlook120_pragsmall
12 Mar 2009, 03:35
Kevin Yank (4 posts)

To be honest, I never read the episode synopsis. I read the description of the series, bought the series, downloaded the series, and then watched the episodes in order.

Here is how the series is described:

bq. Objective-C is the programming language for writing native iPhone and Mac applications. It’s also the language that Apple uses to build their own applications and frameworks. So, if you know Objective-C, you have a lot of power at your fingertips. But if you’re new to C or object-oriented programming, then Objective-C can seem a little awkward at first. These screencasts by Bill Dudney, an experienced Objective-C programmer, will help you quickly get up to speed on Objective-C 2.0 basics.

bq. After watching these video tutorials, you’ll be more confident to start writing high-quality iPhone and Mac applications. You’ll not just know how to write code, you’ll also understand why it works. You’ll feel more comfortable with the Objective-C syntax and object-oriented programming in general. You’ll also be able to manage memory wisely and diagnose common memory problems. You’ll have added yet another programming language to your toolbox, and your resume!

There is no particular focus on the iPhone advertised here. The iPhone and the Mac are presented as peers, as they should be. As someone primarily interested in targeting the Mac, I must say that to discover the series was intended to focus on iPhone development at this late stage is pretty disappointing.

Biopic_100x100_pragsmall
12 Mar 2009, 11:13
Bill Dudney (917 posts)

Hi Kevin,

Sorry again.

Is there some question in particular that you would like answered about the garbage collector? I’d be happy to answer it.

Kevlook120_pragsmall
12 Mar 2009, 22:44
Kevin Yank (4 posts)

Thanks, Bill.

I’ve found the Garbage Collection Programming Guide in the official developer documentation and plan to read that to get started. I’ll be sure to drop a note in here if I get stuck.

For now, consider this my vote for coverage of garbage collection to be added to this series. I’d certainly prefer to learn it by following examples in an engaging screencast than by reading Apple’s dry docs.

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