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24 Jul 2010, 01:16
Brad Hutchins (142 posts)

Off to a great start. Still young but a strong following. Many say it will never come to the iPhone because of the overhead. Well, with each iteration of the iPhone the CPU becomes more powerful, and more RAM is added. And iPhone OS 3.0 supports multi-core processors . . . Hmmmm.

Project home page: http://www.macruby.org/

Pragmatic Studio’s “Mike Clark” has not 1, but 2 free web cast. http://pragmaticstudio.com/screencasts

Peepcode is right behind them… http://peepcode.com/products/meet-macruby

The original screencasts for Rubyconf 2008. http://rubyconf2008.confreaks.com/macruby-ruby-for-your-mac.html http://rubyconf2008.confreaks.com/os-x-application-development-with-hotcocoa.html

http://rubyconf2008.confreaks.com/what-all-rubyist-should-know-about-threads.html http://rubyconf2008.confreaks.com/the-ruby-code-review-a-play-in-three-acts.html

Ok the last two were just plugs for Jim Weirich talks . . . but his talks are always well worth listing too. Even if he gives a talk about Oatmeal… :)

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22 Jun 2009, 02:21
Brad Hutchins (142 posts)

Oh and with release of Snow Leopard and MacRuby 0.5 it will be under support of the GCD for multi-threaded and concurrent programming…. neat

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13 Oct 2009, 22:48
Brad Hutchins (142 posts)

Ahhh . . . progress.
Beginning signs of next big step. Left YARV, and moved onto LLVM for faster code. Sweet.

http://www.macruby.org/blog/2009/10/07/macruby05b1.html

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09 Dec 2009, 03:15
Brad Hutchins (142 posts)

Second Beta for 0.5 has been out for a while, third and final beta should be just be around the corner. After that, then the final release of 0.5… Huge changes are being made in 0.5 over 0.4. Think I will make a career just coding in MacRuby.

http://www.macruby.org/blog/2009/11/17/macruby05b2.html

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09 Dec 2009, 13:37
David J. (6 posts)

I definitely second this. I want to move to MacRuby for my Ruby needs when it’s ready for prime time. A well thought out Pragmatic text could be perfect.

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10 Dec 2009, 21:06
Brad Hutchins (142 posts)

Though you would like it from your other posting.
Me too i have a couple of high end applications (Daemons) I need to write for an ongoing project in telecom. And I would love to use MacRuby as the language because of its improved speed and multicore capabilities… Give Apple a chance to break into the telcom community to show what there OS (Server) can do.

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15 Dec 2009, 01:02
Brad Hutchins (142 posts)

Video quality a bit off. But a good watch just the same.

http://agaelebe.blip.tv/file/2730084/

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15 Dec 2009, 01:45
Brad Hutchins (142 posts)

Neat program that is going to be an GEM for MacRuby. Also HotCocoa is moving to GEM as well for MacRuby

http://rucola.rubyforge.org/

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15 Dec 2009, 01:53
Brad Hutchins (142 posts)

Oh Yeah. I am really liking the concept (sort of a mascot thing) that MacRuby is ruby for people from Scotland…

“Yeeh yes, I beloong to Clan MacRubee, wit a loong leneage of object an-a concurrent proogramming.”

I can just see the T-shirts, Polos, and Coffee Mugs now. Sweeet.

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18 Dec 2009, 04:20
Brad Hutchins (142 posts)

Latest nightly build of 0.5 (12/17) seems to of fixed the problem of “macirb” not launching on 32 bit machines (Intel Core Duo). At least it works on my first Gen MacBook Pro now.

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03 May 2010, 21:53
Brad Hutchins (142 posts)

Latest build just hit 0.6 and now considered a Stable Language for Cocoa Development. Built using the newest LLVM 2.7 (released after 6 months of developing up from 2.6).

http://www.macruby.org/blog/2010/04/30/macruby06.html

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10 Jul 2010, 16:21
Ronnie Martins (4 posts)

I was all for Rubinius when it was announced, but they kind of dropped the ball and MacRuby is keeping good pace… Bring on a book about MacRuby!

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24 Jul 2010, 00:59
Brad Hutchins (142 posts)

Rubinius is still Chugging along. Ironicly Apple is moving from GCC to a total LLVM compiler (with Xcode 4) which the MacRuby language is being compiled with. At the current pace MacRuby should be hitting close to 1.0 by summer 2011. Just in time for the next WWDC, iPhone 5, iPad 2 and perhaps OS X 10.7 (fairly certain MacRuby and Hot Cocoa will be a big topic at next WWDC). The timing all around looks good.

What I would really like to see within the next 2 years in Xcode is MacRuby moving into a position to potentially replace Objective-C as the primary Cocoa (and hopefully iOS) development language… Or at least be on equal footing with Objective-C. I would also love to see Apple bring in the “D” programming language to be a possible alternative to C++ on OS X (since D was developed to be the next evolutionary step in the compiled C language family). And finally, a solid Functional and Concurrent programming language (since Functional programming is suppose to be the next big paradigm in programming). Personally, I hope it is NOT a hybrid language like Scala or Clojure, but a Functional/Concurrent language that is pure to its concepts. Like Haskell.

http://learnyouahaskell.com/chapters

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24 Jul 2010, 02:35
Brad Hutchins (142 posts)

As a rule of thumb, I always get at least 2 “Quality” books about a specific subject matter. Even if the author(s) of one book did a fabulous job at writing it, getting another solid book on the same subject gives another author’s perspective and take on a tech-subject. As well as introducing a different writing style to help “shock” or wake up your brain. Where one book (author) may have fallen short on something, the other book (again, author) may have very well nailed that same part. Thus resulting in your head going… “Ah-Ha! Now I get it.” And visa-versa with the alternate book.

“Quality” for me is usually determined by a 4 to 5 star rating on Amazon.com, out of a base of at least 4 people rating the book. Unless the book is a Pragmatic one… You just know it will be a solid piece of tech-literature. So as you can guess, one of the two books I get on a tech-subject is almost always a Pragmatic book… Unless, of course, they simply have not written one about said tech-subject.

EXAMPLE: For Ruby Programming, I have the “Programming Ruby”, from Pragmatic (both 1.8 and 1.9 versions of the book). And for its’ counter part(s), I purchased the “Beginning Ruby: From Novice to Professional”, from Apress (both First Edition for 1.8, and Second Edition for 1.9).

In keeping with this thought process, I tried to talk Aaron Hillegass, of “Big Nerd Ranch” into authoring a MacRuby/HotCocoa book as well. Unfortunately, it is to soon for him to commit to writing one (MacRuby being currently only at version 0.6, and could change significantly by the time version 1.0 is made public).
Especially since he has four new books he is already working on right now (two of which requiring a re-work because of Xcode 4.0, when it is finally is released). But I am sure he may come around when MacRuby is at version 0.8 or higher, when the language feature set is close to being called frozen.

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11 Sep 2010, 14:27
Brad Hutchins (142 posts)

Received word From The MacRuby team that “Hopefully” MacRuby 0.7, the next iteration of the language, will be out sometime this month (September 2010). If so this will keep it on track for an expected “1.0 version” by WWDC 2011 (crossing my fingers).

Also, for those that were not aware, Matt Aimonetti (one of the MacRuby team members) has an free O’Reilly book online for the best current learning and tutorial info. The book addresses the marrying of Ruby and Cocoa within MacRuby. http://macruby.labs.oreilly.com/

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14 Sep 2010, 03:45
Brad Hutchins (142 posts)

Another screen-cast for MacRuby. A bit more up to date. Good presentations too.

http://thinkcode.tv/catalog/introduction-macruby/

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24 Sep 2010, 03:49
Brad Hutchins (142 posts)

Last night (9/20/10) there came an announcement from the MacRuby community. TowerControl 1.0 was released. A Rack-based web application server for MacRuby.

Want to know more… http://www.macruby.org/blog/2010/09/20/announcing-control-tower.html

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04 Oct 2010, 22:06
Brad Hutchins (142 posts)

MacRuby HITS “0.7” status

You can down load here… http://www.macruby.org/

And read up on it here… http://www.macruby.org/blog/2010/10/01/macruby07.html

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30 Nov 2010, 16:00
Brad Hutchins (142 posts)

An announcement from the Developers of MacRuby…

Hi guys,

Now that the vacations are behind us (well, behind me at least :)), it’s time to focus on converging MacRuby for its first stable release, 1.0. My goal is to release it somewhere in 2011 (the sooner the better :)).

In order to smoothly achieve that goal, it’s also time to accelerate the current release system and improve the way we classify and address incoming bugs reports. After talking with the others committers we decided on the following:

1) Much more frequent releases

Starting from now we will release more frequently. Until we reach 1.0, releases will mostly contain bug fixes and improvements, and practically no feature. As a matter of fact, I intend to release trunk as 0.8 next week. By releasing MacRuby more frequently we hope people will also test MacRuby more frequently, and report more bugs.

2) Better bug management

We have too many bugs registered in the tracker, and it’s a pain to manage all of them. Starting from now, we will classify all existing bugs as well as incoming ones in two categories: for 1.0 and for later. We will then only focus on bugs for 1.0. The second step is to reduce the problem into a small test case (if applicable) then attach the #reduction keyword. Once bugs are properly reduced, we can fix them more easily. We intend to attach a keyword to bugs that seem to be easy to fix, this way new comers can help and learn how MacRuby works.

3) Bug smash days

We will organize bug smash days. They will happen on an IRC channel (details forthcoming). The first one will happen this saturday, 6th December. We will have people from 3 different time zones (US west coast, Europe and Japan) on the IRC channel, and our first task will be to start managing all the bugs, using the method described above. New comers are greatly welcomed and we will make sure everyone who wants to help can help.

4) Compatibility support page

The big challenge for MacRuby 1.0 is to have excellent Ruby compatibility. We currently have 2 metrics to test our Ruby compatibility: RubySpec and Rails. However it’s not enough, there are lots of Ruby libraries and C extensions around that we can’t afford to test by ourselves. Therefore, we intend to prepare a webpage on the website that lists Ruby libraries that are known to work with MacRuby, and those who don’t run yet. We will make sure the community can easily update that page. Having an updated list of libraries that we should run should help the team fixing compatibility bugs.

That’s all for now, bug if you have any suggestion on how to improve the current development process, please let us know.

Laurent </i>

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14 Dec 2010, 14:53
Brad Hutchins (142 posts)

MacRuby goes to 0.8

http://www.macruby.org/blog/2010/12/13/macruby08.html

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15 Dec 2010, 04:04
Brad Hutchins (142 posts)

And a new screencast as well from RubyConf.

http://confreaks.net/videos/448-rubyconf2010-macruby-why-and-how

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06 Jan 2011, 20:50
Brad Hutchins (142 posts)

‘Manning’ is doing a MacRuby book as well.

http://www.manning.com/lim/

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16 Oct 2012, 03:48
Muhidin Gort (1 post)

The Zune concentrates on being a Portable Media Player. Not a web browser. Not a game machine. Maybe in the future it’ll do even better in those areas, but for now it’s a fantastic way to organize and listen to your music and videos, and is without peer in that regard. The iPod’s strengths are its web browsing and apps. If those sound more compelling, perhaps it is your best choice.

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