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13 Jul 2010, 14:25
Tom Tessier (4 posts)

Hi,

We are learning Ruby on Rails and a consultant recommended we use jRuby on NetBeans 6.9 to build our app, so we are working on that to learn as well. But a lot of the examples in the book don’t work. We tried to get the version of Rails off NetBeans to see if it’s just different from the book but we can’t figure it out. It does not give a Ruby or Rails version, it just gives “Built-in JRuby 1.5.0”.

Not that I’m asking for NetBeans support here! I’m just wondering if we’re barking up the wrong tree in starting a new language and should use a different Ruby/Rails programming environment.

-Tom

Generic-user-small
13 Jul 2010, 15:35
Tom Tessier (4 posts)

OK we did find out that it uses Rails 2.3.4

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13 Jul 2010, 19:18
Bharat Ruparel (148 posts)

Tom, I have used NetBeans extensively as well as Rubymine and they both are fine IDEs. My advice in learning to use “any” ruby is that you use an editor instead of an IDE. The reason is simple: you will get to know the actual environment that you are working with. I am using both MRI and JRuby and work with VIM, but it could be any editor, e.g., EMACS or TextMate or what not. The IDEs will mask the actual commands from you and therein lies the problem. You will never get a feel of different Rubies behave. In general, I tend to use MRI since it is the most widely used implementation of Ruby and because it gives me the fastest possible response time when developing. I do Jruby because that seems to be the only way I can hope to do anything Ruby in a corporate world dominated by Java. I do not say that in a negative sense. There is simply too much invested in Java for us to ignore it blindly. JRuby is an excellent bridge to Java world. To start off with JRuby and Netbeans does not seem like a good advice to me. Use NetBeans with MRI if you must. Better use MRI with an editor of your choice. Hope this helps. Bharat

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14 Jul 2010, 22:02
Tom Tessier (4 posts)

Thanks for the advice.

NetBeans is a challenge in itself, it acts like there is a memory leak and over time slows to a crawl and also crashes. The Win-doze computer needs rebooting from time to time as well in order to solve the problem. We’ll use an editor instead for ROR exercises.

Generic-user-small
20 Jul 2010, 14:13
Bharat Ruparel (148 posts)

You are welcome. Another thing that you may find useful is that Windows and Ruby are a bad fit especially with MRI. You may be able to work on Windows with JRuby well enough but I haven’t tried that. Ruby was born and bred in Linux/Unix world and therefore it is most stable on the linux/Mac platforms. Bharat

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09 Aug 2010, 23:21
Ben Knowles (1 post)

I’m not a Java fan by any means but NetBeans 6.8 with the Ruby plugin is the best editor I’ve tried so far on Ubuntu. I found it cleaner and friendlier than RubyMine, plus it’s free.

Picked “Ruby 1.8.7” instead of jRuby. There was no explanation what the difference is but I set up Rails the way it explains to in the book and everything has gone fine.

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11 Aug 2010, 05:03
Ingo Gambin (3 posts)

not to mention ruby scripts do seem to run way faster on linux/mac platforms than on any windows platform I have seen so far.

for pure ruby-scripting I’d prefer a simple text-editor, maybe one like gedit wich can be a little enhanced by using several plugins like multiedit (column editing) or command-completion. For bigger projects (like rails apps) i tend to use netbeans as ide. You can easily configure your ruby platforms, which will help, if you develop multiple applications with different ruby/rails versions). You also might want to try netbeans 6.9(.1) with full ruby 1.9.2 and rails 3 support.

I don’t think you’re barking up the wrong tree. You should just get used to ruby first and then to the rails framework… and like Bharat already said, the best way to get started with ruby is by using a ‘simple’ text editor. And I also second Bharat in stating that Windows + Ruby != good combination.

-ingo

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