small medium large xlarge

Back to: All Forums  Modern Vim
Generic-user-small
08 Nov 2017, 02:32
Brandon Pittman (5 posts)

I know the book is trying to cover Vim 8 and Neovim, but since the tail-end of the book is almost all Neovim, why not just go all in on it?

  • Neomake is awesome, and deserves way more attention.
  • Dein is a fantastic plugin manager that actually updates in the background.
  • There are terminal wrappers that let you more easily use terminals.
Drewneil_pragsmall
09 Nov 2017, 18:57
Drew Neil (41 posts)

Neomake is awesome, and deserves way more attention

I find Neomake hard to classify. At one level, it does similar things to the ALE plugin (via file makers). At another level, it does similar things to Dispatch (via project makers). What am I missing?

Generic-user-small
09 Nov 2017, 21:40
Mike (2 posts)

In my experience the ale plugin is not good and generates a lot of used ram and cpu even on a very good machine (larger python and go projects).

I find it sad, that the always present javascript is the perpetual example, it would do the book much better to cover the python ecosystem and maybe something that is not already covered by the intellij-ides, ie elixir.

I’d also like to add, that I started to use neovim a few months ago and was very sceptical and so far, like it a lot better. Building neovim is very easy and it is faster than vim. Building vim is not easy and requires a lot of tweaking for truecolor, etc. Maybe add a guide on how to build it yourself?

–> If you want to emphasise the ide aspect, you have to mention git plugins like fugitive.

Autocompletion seems to cause a headache for many. Especially when one has to use more than one language.

There seems to be a certain movement towards spacemacs and emacs in general (with evil mode). Maybe this should also be mentioned including a simple setup guide. Vim is a language after all…

It should also be mentioned, that the terminal, multiplexer, etc used is a contributing factor. A sluggish or not entirely configured terminal will cause issues, sometimes very weird ones.

Things like undo (many plugins), backup/restore, autosave, scratch, repl, repl/tmux, macros, etc need to be mentioned. Maybe even tiling window managers.

ctrl-p is a plugin with many tie-ins to other plugins, that should be mentioned. I don’t know about fzf.

So far I’m not that impressed by the book.

Drewneil_pragsmall
15 Nov 2017, 15:00
Drew Neil (41 posts)

Mike, there’s a lot to unpack in your comment. Ideally, I’d prefer if you created separate posts in the forum for each subject you want to address.

In my experience the ale plugin is not good and generates a lot of used ram and cpu even on a very good machine (larger python and go projects).

If you’re working with large files, then running a linter automatically on every keystroke is a sure recipe for hogging resources on your machine. You can configure ALE to make it run linters when it suits you (See the section about “Specifying when to run linters”). If you need to work with large files, then you might have more joy making ale run linters less frequently.

I’d also like to add, that I started to use neovim a few months ago and was very sceptical and so far, like it a lot better. Building neovim is very easy and it is faster than vim. Building vim is not easy and requires a lot of tweaking for truecolor, etc. Maybe add a guide on how to build it yourself?

I’m glad to hear that Neovim has won you over, despite your initial scepticism. One of my main goals with this edition of the book is to give Neovim more exposure and encourage more people to try it out. The fact that Neovim is easier to build (and also easier to install) than Vim is a good selling point. I’ll try and work that into the book somehow.

If you want to emphasise the ide aspect, you have to mention git plugins like fugitive.

I’m considering this. I’ve already produced 5 screencasts about fugitive (see my retrospective blog post for more details). I know the plugin really well and I know which features I’d like to write about. To do it justice, I think I’d have to do about 8 - 12 tips on fugitive. My guess is that the material would run to at least 50 pages. I might cover this in a later edition of the book.

Autocompletion seems to cause a headache for many. Especially when one has to use more than one language.

I have high hopes that the Language Server Protocol will make it easier to get good autocompletion across a range of languages. I intend to write about this in Modern Vim, but I’m not ready. LSP itself is not yet mature or widely adopted, and although there are some experimental LSP plugins for Vim/Neovim, it’s not clear to me which one to back. In this edition, I will mention LSP/autocompletion in the appendix “What’s next for Modern Vim”. In a later edition, I hope to be able to devote several tips to the subject.

So far I’m not that impressed by the book.

You know it’s not finished, right? As a beta reader, you will receive free updates for subsequent editions of Modern Vim. I have a grand vision for this book, but it’s going to take more than one edition for me to complete it. Give me a chance.

Generic-user-small
17 Nov 2017, 09:09
Mike (2 posts)

Thanks for the reply and thanks for the book, I know it’s not finished :-)

I know the LSP is not ready. There are completion plugins for various languages, non are perfect, but afaik there is no real good overview about which plugin does what and how well. My hope was the book would shed some light on pros and cons and ready confs and which plugin is “best” for which language.

When you write later edition, you mean editions before the 1st edition, right?

You must be logged in to comment